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Alpenheat Fire-Glove Allround Heated Gloves Review

Alpenheat Fire-Glove Allround Heated Gloves Review

08.01.24 06:54 11Text: NoPain (translated by AI)Photos: Erwin HaidenNo more cold hands: Review of heated all-round gloves on the road bike and for daily use in low temperatures and cold weather.08.01.24 06:54 145

Alpenheat Fire-Glove Allround Heated Gloves Review

08.01.24 06:54 145 NoPain (translated by AI) Erwin Haiden
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No more cold hands: Review of heated all-round gloves on the road bike and for daily use in low temperatures and cold weather.08.01.24 06:54 145

As if winter itself wasn't troublesome enough, the shorter days mean less daylight, the sunlight is weaker, the risk of catching a cold increases. Added to this are snow, ice, and slippery conditions, which can sometimes make daily routines more difficult. And those who like to be active outdoors not only have to fight against their inner laziness but also have to make additional preparations by dressing warmer - ideally according to the layering principle.
Nevertheless: No matter how carefully one wraps up the head, torso, arms, and legs, sooner or later the feeling of coldness in the feet (especially the toes) or the hands (especially the fingers) occurs.

But why do we actually get ice-cold hands and feet?

Ice-cold extremities in a nutshell (Vasoconstriction)

When it's cold, the blood vessels in the outer areas of the body, such as the fingers and toes, constrict. This process, known as vasoconstriction, serves to preserve heat in the body core and minimize the loss of body heat to the surroundings.

When the vessels constrict, the blood flow to these areas is reduced, which leads to a decreased supply of warm blood. This, in turn, can cause the extremities, especially the fingers and toes, to be less well supplied with blood and therefore cool down more quickly. Cold temperatures can also directly affect the skin and tissue in these areas, leading to a sensation of cold.

At the same time, the fingers and toes are further away from the body core, where the vital organs are located. These body parts are therefore more sensitive to external influences such as cold.
Additionally, the fact that fingertips and toes have relatively more surface area compared to volume plays a role. This structure makes them more susceptible to a rapid exchange of heat with the environment.

Response: Due to local narrowing of vessels (vasoconstriction). To counter this effect, it is important to dress appropriately in cold weather to retain warmth, and to ensure good blood circulation to the extremities.

Clothing checklist for cold temperatures
¤ Winter jacket/pants including thermal underwear (layering principle)
¤ Winter cap (+ ideally a closed helmet)
¤ Winter socks (Premium solution: Heated socks)
¤ Overshoes (+ winter shoes)
¤ Winter gloves (Premium solution: Heated gloves - read on!)

  • Alpenheat Fire-Glove Allround Heated Gloves ReviewAlpenheat Fire-Glove Allround Heated Gloves Review
  • Alpenheat Fire-Glove Allround Heated Gloves ReviewAlpenheat Fire-Glove Allround Heated Gloves Review
  • Alpenheat Fire-Glove Allround Heated Gloves Review

Heated Socks and Gloves

Due to our long-standing positive experiences with the Alpenheat Fire-Socks RC, the heated wool socks, it was a natural step to also test the heated gloves from Alpenheat.
The family business founded in 1993 in Austria is one of the leading specialists for heated clothing and innovative shoe drying systems. To counteract frozen fingers without too greatly limiting tactile dexterity - after all, the bicycle handlebars need to be securely held and the levers precisely operated - we chose the Alpenheat Fire-Glove Allround gloves.

We tested the all-rounders while road biking, gravel biking, walking, running, and at the Christmas market.

  • Alpenheat Fire-Glove Allround Heated Gloves ReviewAlpenheat Fire-Glove Allround Heated Gloves ReviewAlpenheat Fire-Glove Allround Heated Gloves Review
  • Alpenheat Fire-Glove Allround Heated Gloves ReviewAlpenheat Fire-Glove Allround Heated Gloves ReviewAlpenheat Fire-Glove Allround Heated Gloves Review
  • Alpenheat Fire-Glove Allround Heated Gloves ReviewAlpenheat Fire-Glove Allround Heated Gloves Review
  • Alpenheat Fire-Glove Allround Heated Gloves ReviewAlpenheat Fire-Glove Allround Heated Gloves Review

Size Selection and Ordering

Alpenheat products are available both online and in specialty retail stores. Particularly, sports or outdoor specialty stores that focus on winter, outdoor, fishing, or hunting gear might carry Alpenheat products and offer the opportunity to try the gloves on directly.

Of course, there's also nothing wrong with using the size chart as a guide and ordering the gloves online. However, one should not only look for the lowest price but also keep an eye on shipping costs. After all, it might be necessary to exchange the gloves for a different size after delivery.
A tip: All products can also be ordered through the online store on the official Alpenheat website, and shipping to Austria is free for purchases over 75 Euros.

Detailansicht

I oriented myself on the table, and although I usually order gloves in size Large, my measured hand width was clearly in the range of Medium, at 8.5 cm. So, I ordered Medium, which ultimately turned out to be the right decision.

In this size, the finger length fitted perfectly, the cut was sporty, and the gloves did not bulge excessively. Overall, the Alpenheat Fire-Glove Allround resemble more ordinary winter gloves for cycling or hiking, as opposed to the much bulkier ski or snowboard gloves.

  • Alpenheat Fire-Glove Allround Heated Gloves ReviewAlpenheat Fire-Glove Allround Heated Gloves Review
  • Alpenheat Fire-Glove Allround Heated Gloves ReviewAlpenheat Fire-Glove Allround Heated Gloves Review

Although the Fire-Glove Allround were relatively tight on the fingers, they neither constricted nor limited flexibility. Over time, they even gave a little in their circumference and also fit like a glove on the handlebar grip.
Tip: If you are between two sizes, we recommend going for the larger number.

  • Alpenheat Fire-Glove Allround Heated Gloves Review

Technology

The Alpenheat Fire-Glove Allround are ideal gloves for daily use in low temperatures and cold weather. The heating elements in the gloves are designed so that the heating wires run along the fingers to warm the entire hand. An integrated pocket in each of the gloves provides space for the battery, while the heat regulation can be conveniently controlled by an externally mounted push button.

Alpenheat Fire-Glove Allround

Model Name AG3-M Heated Gloves Fire-Glove Allround Size Medium
Material 100% Polyester, water repellent, windproof, dots on the inside, windstopper at the end of the shaft, YKK zipper
Color Black
Heating Element Flexible heating wires along the fingers, 3 heating levels
Batteries Two rechargeable high-performance Li-Polymer batteries 7.4V / 2 Ah / 14.8Wh (50 x 80 x 10mm; 75 g)
Sizes Small (7), Medium (8), Large (9), X-Large (10)
Charging Time/Charger Charging time 4 hours with 5V charging adapter 100-240V 50/60Hz
Heating Duration 2-5.5 hours (depending on heating level)
Weight 310 g (Gloves in Medium and two battery packs)
Scope of Delivery Gloves (AG3), two battery packs (BP11), charger (LG31)
Price € 259.00 RRP

Depending on the selected heating level, the battery life according to the manufacturer's specifications is between 2 and 5.5 hours. To have full power for the next use, the batteries need to be charged for about four hours with the supplied charger.
Wisely, the USB-5V charging adapter has a cable with two outputs, allowing both high-performance Li-Polymer batteries (each 7.4V / 2 Ah / 14.8Wh) to be charged at the same time. Only when both LEDs on the charger light up green are the batteries fully charged and ready for use.

Tip: The batteries should be charged at least once in the period of 3-4 months. When not in use, store the batteries in a cool and dry place - ideally in a fireproof Lipo protection bag.

  • Alpenheat Fire-Glove Allround Heated Gloves Review

In practice

First off: The purpose of these heated gloves is not to provide me with comfortably warm hands during short cycling trips. Rather, they serve to spare me from having to deal with painful or "frozen" fingers at extreme temperatures, not to mention the impaired motor skills and distraction.

The gloves are characterized by a particularly large opening for easy putting on and taking off, combined with a slim design. The thick cuffs, which house cables and batteries, are always worn over the jacket and can be tightly secured with cuffs and cords. In this way, drafts, snow, and even larger amounts of rain are effectively kept at bay. The higher weight of the gloves due to the batteries is noticeable, but does not interfere in practice since the hands spend most of the time on the handlebars anyway.

For maximum wearing comfort, the gloves are made from soft polyester. While the Windstopper material on the outside ensures improved insulation, a fluffy, fleece-like material on the inside provides comfort. The integrated heating wires along the fingers and seams do not cause any irritation. Touchscreen-compatible fingertips on the thumb and index finger allow for flawless operation of a smartphone or bike computer.

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  • Alpenheat Fire-Glove Allround Heated Gloves ReviewAlpenheat Fire-Glove Allround Heated Gloves Review

The gloves warm up, but never become as hot as one might know from motorcycle heated grips. On the highest heating level, they offer about two hours of battery life, while on the lowest level, they practically reach a tight five hours.
In tests down to -5 degrees Celsius, they proved themselves on the highest level just as well as at temperatures up to 5 degrees plus on the lowest level (or completely turned off). For those who are particularly sensitive to cold or want to cover longer distances, it is recommended to carry a second set of batteries.

Besides their excellent insulation and comfortable, sporty fit, the gloves also provide a secure grip on the handlebars. The grip on the carbon part of the racing handlebars as well as shifting and braking worked flawlessly. Even the narrow shift buttons of the Dura-Ace Di2 could be operated without any problems.

  • Alpenheat Fire-Glove Allround Heated Gloves ReviewAlpenheat Fire-Glove Allround Heated Gloves Review
  • Alpenheat Fire-Glove Allround Heated Gloves ReviewAlpenheat Fire-Glove Allround Heated Gloves Review
  • Alpenheat Fire-Glove Allround Heated Gloves ReviewAlpenheat Fire-Glove Allround Heated Gloves Review
  • Alpenheat Fire-Glove Allround Heated Gloves Review

Castelli Unlimited Shoecover

In addition to the heated gloves and the helmet, the brand new Castelli Unlimited Shoe Covers are real game changers. Not only can they be easily pulled over bulky MTB or gravel shoes thanks to the long zipper and stretchy fabric, but they also have a large opening at the bottom with Velcro closure, which also avoids any collision with different sole profiles or pedal plates.

The warm material with fleece lining provides a lot of warmth; the additional DWR treatment ensures that the shoe cover is water-repellent. A durable panel protects the lower part while walking. The reflective pull tab of the zipper increases safety. Recommended for temperatures between 0 and 14 degrees, available in five sizes (S-XXL), in black and for 64.95 euros.

  • Alpenheat Fire-Glove Allround Heated Gloves Review

20 Tips for Road Cycling Training in the Cold

When temperatures drop below the zero-degree mark, choosing to train on your bike isn't easy. Here you'll find some tips to get through with dignity.

#1-10

1. Clothing: Invest in functional clothing based on the layering principle, paying special attention to the protection of the head, fingers, and feet/toes. Bright colors and reflective details do no harm, even though the author himself prefers to wear dark and black. #WhoWantsToLiveForever
2. Lighting: Only venture into the terrain and especially onto public roads with powerful lighting: strong front light, rear light, and helmet lamp (Note: the use of helmet lamps is not allowed in Germany in road traffic). Side reflectors like cat's eyes or glued-on reflective strips might be unsightly, but they increase visibility.
3. Battery charge state: Always fully charge the batteries of lights, mobile phone, bike computer, etc., as battery life is usually greatly reduced at low temperatures.
4. Cycling glasses: Cycling glasses with automatically darkening or lightening variable lenses protect the eyes and prevent blind flights in the quickly approaching darkness.
5. Tires: Wide tires with soft compound, deep tread (side knobs would be optimal) and slightly reduced air pressure increase grip.
6. Spikes: Bicycle tires with spikes only make sense if you are traveling on icy terrain - caution is advised on asphalt; if the road is just wet and not icy, spikes can sometimes increase the risk of slipping.
7. Puncture protection: Install sturdy tubes or ride with tubeless sealant - no one wants to have to change a tube in the cold. Nevertheless, carry a spare tube, CO2 cartridges, and good tire levers.
8. Riding style: Use your brain and adopt a riding style suited to the conditions. A cold road means little grip, moisture and ice make for a risky ride. Anticipate longer braking distances - also for other road users.
9. Nutrition: Eat carbohydrate-rich - before, during, and after the ride. Afterwards, don't forget about quickly absorbable proteins.
Warming foods, mostly spicy like chili and ginger, heat up the metabolism from the inside, but only work for a short time. If at all, use them only as a reward kick shortly before the end of the tour and check for compatibility in a protected area beforehand.
10. Face: Protect sensitive facial skin with a fat-based cream.
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  • Alpenheat Fire-Glove Allround Heated Gloves ReviewAlpenheat Fire-Glove Allround Heated Gloves Review

#11-20

11. Training: Es empfiehlt sich, das Outdoor-Training bei Kälte eher unstrukturiert im Grundlagenausdauerbereich zu absolvieren und die volle Konzentration aufs Fahren zu legen. Harte, strukturierte Trainingseinheiten (HIT) in höheren Wattbereichen besser in den eigenen vier Wänden auf dem Rollentrainer absolvieren. Neben einer zu hohen Intensität können aber auch zu lange Fahrten bei schlechtem Wetter das Immunsystem schwächen.
12. Atmung: Durch die Nase (je nach Setup eventuell auch durchs Balaclava oder die Gesichtsmaske) atmen, damit die Luft etwas angewärmt und angefeuchtet wird. Achtung: Atmet man durch die Maske, besteht je nach Luftfeuchtigkeit und Temperatur die Gefahr, dass kondensierte Atemluft unangenehme Nässe erzeugt oder gefriert. Vorzugsweise nicht zu tief einatmen (Bronchien, Belastungsasthma, etc.), also bei großer Kälte eher im Grundlagenbereich trainieren.
13. Trinken: Isolierte Trinkflasche nahe am Körper unter der Jacke tragen oder hochwertige Thermosflasche mit heißem Tee oder Suppe mitführen. Kohlenhydratreiche Getränke dicker bzw. süßer mit Maltodextrin anmischen als bei warmem Wetter.
14. Handschuhe: Beheizbare Handschuhe tragen oder ein zweites Paar dicke Handschuhe mitführen. Es ist ein unbeschreibliches Gefühl, wenn man bei Halbzeit der nasskalten Tour in trockene Handschuhe schlüpfen kann.
15. Warme Füße: Gegen die Kältebrücke zum Pedal können spezielle oder beheizbare Einlegesohlen, Heizsocken oder Zehenwärmer helfen. Unterwegs Zehengymnastik machen; auch spezielle Sport-Wärmecremes können die Füße warm halten. Winddichte und wasserabweisende Überschuhe wirken Wunder.
16. Schuhe: Wird es an den Füßen gar zu kalt, öfters mal absteigen, das Rad schieben oder daneben herlaufen. Mit MTB-Schuhen läuft es sich leichter. Wegen der dickeren Socken, den Einlagen und des wärmenden Luftpolsters lieber eine halbe Nummer größer wählen - am besten mit höherem Schaft.
17. Untersatz: Unter -5 Grad empfiehlt es sich, wegen der durchwegs niedrigeren Geschwindigkeiten (Windchill) auf den Crosser oder das MTB umzusteigen.
18. Aufwärmen: Gemächliches Aufwärmen nach der Tour - eventuell am Indoor-Trainer. Eingefrorene Gliedmaßen sollte man langsam wieder auftauen, zum Beispiel mit kaltem Wasser. Keinesfalls sofort unter die heiße Dusche oder ins heiße Bad: Der Wärmeschock nach einem Kälteschock greift das Immunsystem noch mehr an.
19. Open Window Effekt: Das Immunsystem wird im kalten, nassen Wetter geschwächt und kann dich unter Umständen anfälliger für Erkrankungen machen. Stichwort "Open Window Effekt": Im Anschluss ans Training menschenüberfüllte Plätze meiden, erholen, Hände waschen, frische Luft atmen, etc.
20. Vernunft: Bei Schneematsch, Schneefahrbahn oder Glatteis wäre es vernünftiger, das Radtraining Indoor zu vollziehen oder auf alternative Sportarten umzusatteln.
  • Alpenheat Fire-Glove Allround Heated Gloves Review

Conclusion

Alpenheat Fire-Glove Allround
Review duration: 2 months
Price: € 259.00 RRP
+ Good heating performance with three heat settings
+ Compact cut
+ Secure grip on the handlebars
+ High flexibility for operating shift and brake levers.
+ High-quality workmanship
+ Touch function on index finger and thumb
+ Comfortable despite the cables, heating elements, and batteries
o Only short heat duration at the highest setting
o Purchase price
- Only spot cleaning by hand recommended
BB-Verdict: The premium solution for clammy hands and frozen fingers


The model Fire-Glove Allround by Alpenheat impressively proves that extremely warm gloves do not necessarily have to come with a loss of tactility and mobility. In addition to their sporty fit and high comfort, they are above all the first gloves in which I had no cold, stiff fingers at all even at temperatures well below freezing point.

Although one should not expect miracles from the actual heating performance, the heated gloves convince with their simple and efficient operation: After activating them by pressing the buttons on the outside, the heat can be comfortably regulated and delights the wearer with pleasantly warm hands and fingers just a few minutes later. The cuffs, which contain the batteries, extend far over the wrists and should easily combine with normal-cut cycling jackets or jerseys. The wiring along the fingers is noticeable, but if the gloves are not bought too small, it is not necessarily bothersome - after all, they feel warm.

The heated glove is especially suitable for people with poor circulation or Raynaud's syndrome. In our tests, the heating performance lasted for about two hours at the highest setting even at outdoor temperatures between -5 and 0°C, until the batteries made themselves known and then switched off shortly afterwards. Hands and fingers were always pleasantly warm - subjectively at body temperature.
Whoever wants to be out longer has to switch to a lower heating power. Of course, the fingers will still be a bit cooler, but the difference between the Alpenheat and ordinary gloves is like night and day.

Comfort naturally comes at a price, because at 259.95 euros, the gloves are not exactly cheap. In addition to the costly initial purchase, there are two other system-related disadvantages. Firstly, handling the expensive Li-Ion batteries requires a certain amount of attention; although they are not as sensitive as one might think, they should be recharged every three to four months to avoid deep discharge - but not fully charged! Correct storage at temperatures between 0 and 15 degrees increases their lifespan, while permanently high charge levels or complete discharge have a negative impact.
Secondly, due to their construction, the gloves can only be washed carefully by hand. Thanks to the materials used, however, they are not prone to unpleasant odors and therefore do not need to be cleaned after every outing.

  • Alpenheat Fire-Glove Allround Heated Gloves Review